Poorer children half as likely to get into best schools, research shows : The Guardian

TeachFirst charity says findings demonstrate that ‘social mobility remains a serious issue in our country’

Children from poor families are only half as likely to get places in outstanding schools compared with their wealthier peers, according to new research published on the eve of national primary school offer day in England.

As 600,000 families in England wait to see if their children have gained a place at a school of their choice, the charity TeachFirst says those from disadvantaged families have fewer opportunities of being admitted to the top tier of state schools.

Only 15% of children from the poorest 30% of families currently attend a primary school rated as outstanding by Ofsted inspectors, compared with 27% of children from the richest 30% of families.

Eleven per cent of children from the poorest families attend a primary school rated as inadequate or requiring improvement, Ofsted’s two lowest tiers, compared with 6% of children from the richest households.

“These figures show that social mobility remains a serious issue in our country,” said Brett Wigdortz, the chief executive of TeachFirst.

“We know that all families care about giving their children the best possible start in life but, as outstanding schools are unfairly concentrated in richer communities, poorer families are finding themselves priced out.”

The researchers found that the difference in access worsened at secondary school level, where 24% of the poorest children go on to secondary schools rated as requiring improvement or inadequate, compared with 10% of children from wealthy families.

READ MORE : THE GUARDIAN

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