MP calls for clock-in cards to prove peers are putting in ‘full shift’ : Guardian.

SNP spokesman wants tap-out system in parliament after claims that lords popped in just to claim £300 daily allowance

Oyster cards being used on London underground
Tommy Sheppard suggested the security passes could work in a similar way to London transport’s Oyster cards. Photograph: Philip Toscano/PA

Peers and MPs should use security cards to tap in and out of parliament so the public can see how much time they are spending in Westminster, a senior MP has proposed.

Tommy Sheppard, SNP spokesman in the Commons, has written to the Speakers of both houses and the head of security in the Palace of Westminster asking them to consider his proposal. He suggests it would not only help transparency, but would also aid the authorities in emergency situations.

The proposal follows claims that a small number of peers have abused a system that allows them to claim £300 a day once they have signed in to the House of Lords. MPs are paid a salary of £74,000 a year.

Lord Fowler, the Speaker in the Lords, announced last week that the current pass system would be replaced in the autumn.

Most parliamentarians and staff use their security passes and a personalised code to enter the parliamentary estate through security gates. As they exit, however, they can walk through gates without the use of their security pass.

Sheppard said using Oyster-style cards would mean the public could monitor how long MPs and peers have been at work and whether they were value for money.

Such a system would also be cost-effective and offer the benefit of allowing the authorities to know how many people are in the building in the event of a terrorist attack or a fire, the MP for Edinburgh East said.

“There are legitimate concerns about the costs of the House of Lords. Some are concerned they are claiming £300 for a day’s work and not putting in a full shift. I want to prove that wrong by enhancing the security system so it records how long they spend in parliament.”

Members of the Lords are not asked to use their pass codes if they enter the parliamentary estate through the peers’ entrance. At present, there is no way of recording whether peers, MPs or staff have left the estate from one of more than eight exits.

In March, the former Lord Speaker Lady D’Souza claimed she saw one peer keep a cab running as he rushed in and out of the Lords to claim his daily allowance.

Read More : Guardian.

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3 Comments

  1. They are just laughing in our faces. They turn up for just long enough to claim a daily allowance of £300, when the majority of people in the country are working all hours and bringing home less than that for a weeks work. Then they wonder why we despise them.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. It’a about time every single MP, Peer, or any other employee of the state, is made accountable to the hours they claim they work, and are made to clock in and out of their jobs, just like the rest of us have to when employed and, if it’s found that they aren’t doing the amount of hours they are being paid for, then their wages should be docked – just like they would be in the real world!

    They have been employing ordinarly people to do work for them, and expect those workers to put in a full day – well so should every Peer, or MP, who are employed by the state – and that daily ‘allowance’ of £300 should be shrunk to the paltry 1% they all think our Nurses, Doctors, Police, Fire Brigade and Teachers etc are worth – at least all of those workers on the list actually do a job of work for their money, unlike far too many Peers and MP’s 😦

    Like

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